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GEOLOGY OF THE WILDCAT COPPER DEPOSIT IN THE
ANTAMOK MINE OF BENGUET CONSOLIDATED, INC.

Florian V. Damasco

 

 

 

 

ABSTRACT


The Wildcat Copper Deposit in the Antamok Mine is a massive sulfide deposit occurring in Paleocene to Eocene submarine coarse metaclastic-volcanic sequence called the Wildcat conglomerate. Ore formation is believed to have occurred in mid-Miocene time. The deposit is cut up and faulted by younger gold-quartz veins. Intense sericitization is the main alteration guide. The main copper mineral is chalcopyrite, comprising as much as 90% of the total safides in the ore. The ore texture is blebby to massive. A pyritic halo occurs around the orebody. With a cut-off of 1.0% Cu, mining rates by underhand cut·and fill range from 8,000 to almost 15,000 MT per month. Ore reserves of between 400,000 and 700,000 MT
have been maintained through the years since the discovery of this blind deposit by Company geologists in 1968.

From the academic point of view, the genesis of the deposit is thought to be either syngenetic (volcanogenic) or as an epigenetic hydrothermal deposit. Ore must have formed after remobilization due to nearby igneous intrusive activities, then reconcentrated in the highly permeable Wildcat conglomerate. Another point of interest is whether or not the top of the orebody is a post-ore unconformity or a conformable contact between the host rock and the overlying Middle Keratophyre formation.

 

 

 

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